The Independent publishes today, The Great Animal Rights Betrayal, a front page lead story continued onto pages 4 and 5, which includes several side bars under the banner, “The Betrayals,” on Game birds, Slaughterhouse cruelty, Circus animals, Beak trimming and Badger cull. There’s also a Comment by Peter Stevenson, Chief Policy Advisor, Compassion In World… Read More


Science does not operate alone in its own universe. Regardless of how much scientists assert their work is objective, their research, as, indeed, is everything, is viewed subjectively in the ever present, including the world of politics and morality. Take, for example, the coalition government’s commitment to culling badgers in response to the spread of… Read More


This is a brilliant initiative from Anonymous, the animal rights groups based in Israel. They’ve installed a live web cam in a battery cage, which the farming industry can’t find to turn off. Click here to go live inside a battery cage. Still want to eat eggs?… Read More


Intriguing article, The Rise of the Power Vegans, in Businessweek. It used to be easy for moguls to flaunt their power. All they had to do was renovate the chalet in St. Moritz, buy the latest Gulfstream jet, lay off 5,000 employees, or marry a much younger Asian woman. By now, though, they’ve used up… Read More


Given it requires the suffering and slaughter of billions of animals worldwide, it’s difficult to understand how any animal food can be called any kind of extravagance let alone a benign one. Anyway, in today’s Guardian columnist George Monbiot discusses a new book, Meat: A Benign Extravagance, by Simon Fairlie. I admit to not being… Read More


The abstract (in full below) of the paper, Diet and the environment: does what you eat matter? published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, concludes that it does matter what you eat. Food demand influences agricultural production. Modern agricultural practices have resulted in polluted soil, air, and water; eroded soil; dependence on imported oil;… Read More


Will Self nails it perfectly. Supermarkets are the abattoirs of capitalism and we are but so many cattle, driven along brightly lit aisle after aisle until our credit is electrocuted.… Read More


Life in the Old Town is nothing if not interesting. For example, I chronicled over the last few months the growth of a group of five baby Herring gull chicks who I watched from the back of my house. We know one didn’t survive and as the other four have gone I presume they all… Read More


Joanna Blythman writing in The Daily Telegraph. Cloning is predicated on extreme animal suffering. Cloned food brings no additional nutritional benefits for human health, and insufficient research has been done to say with any authority that it presents no risks. As with genetically modified food, cloning is a standard-bearer for the increasingly dysfunctional, hi-tech agri-business… Read More


With so much published I want to read I confess to reading often the end first. Conclusions quickly let you know what the rest of the article says and how the author is saying it. Then I decide if I want to bother with the rest of it. Take, for example, the New Scientist and its article,… Read More


The New York Times editorial, “A Humane Egg,” is so outstanding that it deserves to be reproduced in full. The life of animals raised in confinement on industrial farms is slowly improving, thanks to pressure from consumers, animal rights advocates, farmers and legislators. In late June, a compromise was reached in Ohio that will gradually… Read More


More sanctimonious and self-righteous justification for killing animals to eat them by Guardian food critic Jay Rayner. This time — and for the first time — he watches the animal he will later eat be killed. The animal in question is number 365, which happens to be the number of days in the year. This… Read More


The agreement struck between The HSUS with Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland and the Ohio Farm Bureau to stop the ballot initiative scheduled for this November which was to promote humane standards and prevent cruel factory farming practices is causing outrage in the state’s farming interests and raising questions by animal advocates. The core argument in… Read More


Burger Queen by Will Self The other afternoon I was cycling up the Mall when the Queen emerged from the gates of Buckingham Palace, so plumply erect in her customised Daimler that she resembled nothing so much as a cerise pouffe propped up in an old-fashioned Silver Cross perambulator. There was only a smattering of… Read More


Cheap food isn’t as cheap as it would appear, as Felicity Lawrence writes in “Free choice isn’t healthy for the food industry’s menu” in The Guardian recently. Further, the real cost of cheap food in terms of human morbidity and mortality as well as the significant impact on animal welfare and the environment are not… Read More


The moral and legal status of animals is not an isolated issue as it clearly exists and relates to the society in which it exists or doesn’t, as the case maybe. Regrettably, the animal welfare/rights movement has yet to succeed in effectively placing a concern for animals in a larger and progressive context. This point… Read More


In a historic move for animals in Australia, the Tasmanian Minister for Primary Industries and Water, Bryan Green, today announced his government’s plan to place restrictions on the time pregnant sows are allowed to be kept in stalls from 2014, with a full ban coming into effect in 2017. This puts Tasmania ahead of the… Read More


The Slow Food USA Blog says Since the oil disaster began, I have heard from Slow Food friends across the United States who ask, “How can we help?” The single best way to assist your food friends of the Gulf is to EAT GULF SEAFOOD.… Read More


I’m still catching up with my pre-general election life and do not want to forget to mention that I had an opportunity to see the documentary, “The Vanishing of the Bees.” There is a crisis happening with bees which will impact our ability to produce food. My colleague at Compassion In World Farming, Philip Lymbery,… Read More