I celebrate the beginning of each year with my vegetarian and vegan anniversaries. On January 1, 1974, I became a vegetarian after working in a chicken slaughterhouse the previous summer when I was a student. The only vegetarian I knew at the time, Mandy, convinced me to give up eating meat and fish. Two years… Read More


Knowing Animals is a regular 30 minutes podcast about all things related to animals and ethics; animals and the law; animals and politics; and animal advocacy. It features interviews with academic and animal advocates. Episode 155 features an interview with yours truly. Host Josh Milburn invited me to discuss two topics. First, my chapter, ‘A… Read More


Notwithstanding those who say to the contrary, authors appreciate reviews, particularly when they’re positive. Recently, I discovered an enthusiastic review of my book, Growl, posted anonymously on Amazon. The author then contacted me and my delight in the review was enhanced when I discovered who it was. It’s for these reasons that I want to… Read More


The Kim Stallwood Archive of research material documenting the history of the animal rights movement will become part of the British Library’s permanent holdings starting in autumn 2020. The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and provides information services to academic, business, research, and scientific communities. My unique archive chronicle the animal… Read More


Animal advocates often moan about politicians because they don’t care about animals. They also complain about how existing legislation for animals is often biased in favour of those abusing animals. I share these frustrations. I also believe there’s a way forward for the animal rights movement to ensure our elected representatives and governments do care about animals and act effectively on their behalf. I advocate a strategy to put animals into politics.… Read More


Tired of living in a world where animals have no value. Wherever you look, they’re treated like garbage. Fine to export them across oceans even though thousands of them die en route. OK to let them burn alive trapped in cages in factory farms because they’re not worth anything—not even a water sprinkler system or… Read More


Topsy was in her late twenties when she was murdered at Luna Park on Coney Island in New York on January 4, 1903. The murder scene is one of America’s first theme parks at a time when the United States emerges as an industrial world leader. My use of the word “murder” rather than “killed” is deliberate. Her life and death represent the fate of many animals—not just elephants and not just in the entertainment industry. Even though some thought her guilty, I felt she was innocent.… Read More